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Showing posts from March, 2018

Quantifying the role of permafrost distribution in groundwater and surface water interactions using a three-dimensional hydrological model

Following my earlier post on promoting my research, this is the second study that I conducted in an attempt to understand the hydrology processes in high latitudes.

You are encouraged to read the first post for a background understanding of this study.
Let's cut to the chase, the title of this study is "Quantifying the role of permafrost distribution in groundwater and surface water interactions using a three-dimensional hydrological model", and you can access the paper through here or this.
In Arctic, snow and glacier are not the only players in the hydrology processes. Permafrost, the so called frozen soil is also an important player in both hydrology and carbon cycles.
There are several reasons for that: It is frozen, so it could potentially release a lot of water in the warming climate;Permafrost degradation can change the landscape, then both the carbon and water cycles will be affected;Permafrost is like a barrier, it blocks interactions. Therefore, permafrost degra…

Quantifying the Role of Snowmelt in Stream Discharge in an Alaskan Watershed

Inspired by fellow science social on publication and citation, I decided to write a few short introduction posts on my recent publications.

Aside to promote my research, I also want to explain the research in depth for those who do not have a background in related research.

My first talk is about my paper titled "Quantifying the Role of Snowmelt in Stream Discharge in an Alaskan Watershed: An Analysis Using a Spatially Distributed Surface Hydrology Model". You can find the abstract of this paper from "https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2017JF004214"

As the introduction explained, the major motivation of this study is due to the sensitivity of cryosphere to the warming climate. In general, the climate change community all agree that the high latitudes are more vulnerable to the global warming. If the global temperature increases, lots of snow cover and glacier may disappear. In fact, this is happening right now and reported by numerous observat…